Wild Mushroom Risotto

Foraging for mushrooms is ritualistic and requires immense patience. After hours spent tromping through mushroom territory, you may come home bearing pounds, ounces, or none of the marvelous treasure. Filled with the earthy nuances of wild fungi, this mushroom risotto balances rich textures with umami flavors with a bright pop of lemon, fresh herbs, and aromatic fennel pollen. A wonderful dish to serve throughout the year, it is particularly nice during the holiday season.
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Squash Caponata: The Perfect Thanksgiving Side

Bringing influences from Arabia, Greece, Spain, and France, Sicilian caponata is an expression of the islands history. Stewed into a deliciously tangy, sweet and sour agrodolce sauce, eggplant is traditionally the hero of the classic dish. This adaptation swaps eggplant for hearty squash, making it the perfect dish to serve for the holidays.
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Mother Tree: A Symbol of Our Heritage

Native to the Monti Sicani region of Sicily, the Biancolilla Centinara olive tree species was thought to be extinct until a team of researchers at the University of Palermo, including our Chief Scientist and Master Botanist, Dr. Pasquale "Mimmo" Marino, rediscovered it. Self-pollinating and quick to produce fruit, Mimmo recognized the importance of this varietal and carefully nurtured the species to once again thrive in the soils of its heritage.
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Slow-Braised Ossobuco

Made with cross-cut shanks of beef or veal, this is one Italy's most renowned (and of course delicious) braises. Serve with risotto, cripsy prosciutto and Grana Padano. Discover what you've been missing.
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Busiate alla Trapanese

Not all pestos are green. Pesto comes from the Italian word Pestare, meaning to grind. In Sicily, the most famous pesto is pesto allá trapanese, from the Mediterranean town of Trapani, Sicily. Adding tomatoes and swapping pine nuts for almonds, Sicilians took the pesto alla genovese and made a dish that's uniquely their own.
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